Poison by Galt Niederhoffer- DNF at 20%

There are too many great books out there for me to waste time on books like Poison. It felt like I was reading a basic outline of a piece of fiction rather than a completed novel. I skimmed through a lot of this 20% that I did read because the writing style is excessive yet basic. For example, when describing the wife it was something along the lines of saying she’s a former single mother of two, now baby makes three, and new husband makes a family of five. She works from home, requiring a babysitter so she can work while at home, working on the household chores while working, baby screaming while she’s on the phone, covering the phone with her hand to block out the screams, yet keeping a professional tone despite the maternal desire to soothe the baby.

I wish I could say that was an extreme example, however, I do not think it was that far of a stretch. It was excessively wordy yet not really revealing anything. The new husband is also excessive. He is over the top in the examples of how seemingly perfect he is supposed to be that I already did not trust him within the first few pages. It is clear that he is a bad guy, but what is not clear yet is why and how. I am sure that is further discussed in the book but, quite frankly, I just don’t care.

Please note: An electronic copy of this book was generously provided for free from the Publisher via NetGalley in exhcange for an honest review (thank you!).

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The Beautiful Ones by Silvia Moreno-Garcia- a 3/5 Star Review

Antonina (“Nina”) Beaulieu is headstrong, passionate, and finally escaping the countryside to enter her first season in London. Instructed by her dispassionate and downright mean cousin, Valerie, to hide her telekinetic powers, Nina does not do a very good job of keeping it a secret. Mostly because she does not know how to control them (kind of like Elsa before she gets her gloves in Disney’s Frozen). She finally gets the chance to meet someone like her, Hector Auvray, who can help her rein her powers in until appropriate. But it’s not just her powers that attract Hector’s attention. It’s her connection to the one true love he could never get over; her cousin Valerie.

I took away one star because of the slow pace and how often it is beat into the reader’s head that Valerie is the villain. Although I appreciate that the reasoning for her cold and greedy heart was given, it still was too forced that she was the antagonist.

I took another star away for two reasons:

1. I did not get attached to the romance between Nina and Hector. I thought it was very immature and overly dramatic.

2. It is touted as sci-fi but that only came to the telekinetic powers that Nina and Hector have. I understand that the telekinetic element is supposed to unify Hector and Nina as it is something that they share as well as makes them outsiders in society, however, it didn’t scream science fiction to me.

When it comes to characters, my favorite was Entienne, Hector’s friend. He was calm, loyal, and had a dry, frank sense of humor. If there were to be anything further done with this plot, be it a sequel or spin-off, I do so hope it focuses on Entienne. He honestly saved the book for me at the points where I was tempted to put it down and be done with it. The other supporting characters seemed to be either shallow or weak. I can see why Valerie’s husband Gaetan should be weak (for the most part) to balance Valerie’s ferocity, however, it was still somewhat redundant.

I would recommend this book for readers who enjoy a manipulative and selfish villain. I would also recommend this book for readers who enjoy telekinesis. Lastly, I would recommend this book for readers who enjoy insects, particularly beetles, as they play a large part in the plot.

I would not recommend this book for readers who may be triggered or offended by the following: mild foul language, suggestions of adultery, bullying, manipulation, and attempted murder.

Please note: an electronic copy of this book was generously provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review (thank you!).

Anna Dressed In Blood (Anna #1) by Kendare Blake- a 5/5 Star Review!

Cas is a ghost hunter, traveling all over North America to take down murderous ghosts with his special weapon; the athame. While still a high school student, hopping from one school to another does not exactly provide time and availability for long-term friends his own age. He is seeking to avenge his father’s death while saving the lives of the unsuspecting victims of the ghosts he kills. Until he meets the one ghost he doesn’t want to kill.

Anna.

Anna is famously called “Anna Dressed In Blood” in the small Canadian town of Thunder Bay. She haunts the house she died in decades ago and brutally murders anyone who dare step foot in it. Until Cas finds himself inside her house and lives to tell the tale.

I was very surprised at how much I loved this book. It was a Halloween themed pick for this month for a book club that I am in; it is perfect! It is equally haunting and humane. The best example of this is with the ghost of Anna. Her acts of violence are graphically gory, yet her backstory encourages sympathy.

The story was fast-paced and smooth, told in Cas’ perspective. The scenes are so well described that it the gore was discomforting, as it should be. It is kind of like a blend of the tv show Supernatural and the YA book Six of Crows. I recently read Six of Crows (see review here) and so I kept thinking that Cas in this book was misspelling Kaz. In truth, it was the scene in the basement with Cas that reminded me of the scene on the corpse boat with Kaz. The story itself is distinctive, however, particularly in how the story concludes. Therefore, I would certainly recommend this book for fans of Six of Crows and Supernatural.

Conversely, I would not recommend this book for those who may be offended or triggered by parental death, graphic violence, heavy foul language, domestic violence, murder, bullying, witchcraft, ghosts, or VooDoo.

Seven Days of Us by Francesca Hornak- A 3 Star Review!

The Birches have much reason to celebrate this holiday season. Their daughter Olivia is coming home for Christmas, for once. Olivia is a doctor returning from a trip to Liberia where the Haag epidemic has been traumatizing and she is forced into quarantine for 7 days after her return. Joining her will be her mother, Emma, who is keeping a major secret so as not to ruin Christmas. Also present will be her father, Andrew, who writes a column reviewing restaurants and his secret from more than three decades ago will make an appearance. Then her sister, Phoebe, who demands the attention of everyone, still lives at home with her parents, and is planning her wedding during the quarantine. Can they get past the miscommunication and secrets to have a happy Christmas or will the secrets prepare for a battle of betrayal?

It took a long time to pick up speed. Little bread crumbs had been dropped along the way which did build up to the second half, however, the first half was so slow that I was tempted many times to move on to another book. Fortunately, I did make it through and it picked up very quickly after about 60% into the book. A great portion of it was predictable, yet the character development finally comes through and I could not put the book down.

I gave it three stars because I took one star away for how long it took for the story to pick up speed and therefore the amount of times that I was almost at the point of giving up. I took another star away because there were far too many coincidences with the characters and too many secrets that it became overwhelming at times. When Jesse met Emma, for example, and she reveals her secret to him, a stranger. Emma then went on to meet Sean, Olivia’s secret. Jesse also met George, Phoebe’s fiancee, randomly while on a walk and again randomly in a bar and discovered his secret.

I would (and have) recommended this book for those who have traveled to Africa and feel that the warfare and politics of Africa are far too easily ignored in the West. Additionally, for those who feel that the rest of the world groups Africa into one general concept rather than it being an entire continent. I would also recommend this book for readers who enjoy reading about family dynamics and secrets being revealed. Much like (one of my favorite authors) Liane Moriarty books, that are told in different perspectives and center around secrets.

I would not recommend this book for those who may be offended or triggered by: foul language, cancer, sibling rivalry, homophobia, infidelity, infectious diseases, and warfare in Liberia.

Please note: an advanced reader copy of this book was generously provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review (thank you Berkley Publishing Group!)

The Switch by Lynsay Sands-a 4/5 Star Review!

Twins Charlotte (“Charlie”) and Beth are running away from their horrid uncle who is marrying them off to the highest, and most scoundrel, bidder to pay off his steep debt. They are caught in the act of running away by a Lord Radcliffe who decides to take them under his wing for awhile until they can get on their feet and get to London. He doesn’t know the half of the story, however, as he believes he is helping a lad named Charles (Charlie disguised as a man) and his sister Beth.

Hooray for another fun romance and adventure story from Lynsay Sands! This author is quickly climbing up the charts of my favorite authors (see my review for Love is Blind here) and I am so glad my friend recommended her to me (Thanks Laura! 🙂 ). There was adventure, surprise twists, embarrassing moments that had me blushing for the characters, mixed with warmth of friendship and steamy romantic scenes. The concept of the twin girls playing brother and sister and switching roles was unique. Especially as the romance is concerned when Radcliffe finds himself attracted to the sister at times and confused by his attraction to the brother at other times.

The bond of sisterhood between Beth and Charlie was very relatable. The compromises that they made for each other and their strong sense of loyalty to one another reminded me fondly of the relationship with my sister and I. Although I am not a twin as they are, how they developed separately yet still tied to one another resonated with me.

The only thing that I had to take one star away for was that the narrative would switch between Charlie and Radcliffe without distinction which I found to be confusing at times. It was also confusing when Radcliffe was called Jeremy only in the last few pages when he had been called Lord Radcliffe the entire book.

That being said, I did really enjoy the book! I loved the main character, Charlie, and how strong, fearless, selfless, and full of integrity she was throughout the story. I found it incredibly endearing how Radcliffe took Beth and Charlie under his wing and then Charlie took Bessie, puppies, and a mother and her 2 children and then another orphan under her wing, that was still under Radcliffe’s wing. It was like an umbrella effect and my love for the book grew as their troop expanded.

I would recommend this book for those who enjoy a hilarious love story with an underlying theme of loyalty. Furthermore, I would recommend this book for readers who enjoy historical romances with adventure, twists, and puppies!

I would not recommend this book for readers who may be triggered or offended by gambling addiction, prostitution, suicide, alcohol addiction, explicitly sexual scenarios, kidnapping, violence, mild foul language, and murder.

The French Girl by Lexie Elliott- A 3/5 Star Review

Kate Channing is stressed out with starting her own business and looking so far in the future that she is blindsided when the past catches up to her. 10 years ago, she and some friends went on a holiday at a farmhouse out in the country, not everyone survives. What happened that day has haunted the survivors for the past ten years and now the case has been reopened. The investigation brings most of that group back together but so much has changed. This brings them each to ask the same questions: What happened that day? How well can you really know your friends?

I enjoy reading murder mysteries as well as stories about secrets within friendships. This book was well paced, however, I could tell who the murderer was fairly early in the story and the other red herrings were not strong enough to sway me. I did not really care for any of the characters, least of all pathetic Seb. I did not particularly like the narrating character, Kate, although her dark humor did have me chuckle a time or two. Another thing that I did not particularly care for about the book was that justice does not really ever come for the deceased. The story is confessed but there is only social reprimand for the villain, not anything legally, which could have caused a stronger conclusion in my opinion.

Two things were rather distracting for me: Kate’s business and the ghost haunting. Kate started her own business but it is on the verge of bankruptcy and she often takes off work to grab lunch, drinks, or coffee with a friend or two. Furthermore, there is an instance where she does not show up for work on time because she simply does not want to go in. Perhaps I’m a stickler for work ethic but that was distracting and irritating for me. Then the lingering ghost of the deceased was also distracting at times and even the main character states that she cannot figure out the purpose of the character’s presence.

On a more positive note, I did enjoy the eventual romance of two of the characters (I won’t say which in order prevent a spoiler) and thought that was authentic and sweet.

I would recommend this book for readers who like a murder mystery as well as a story on friendship. I would also recommend this book for those who are in/enjoy reading about the field of corporate law practice as that is included in the plot. Lastly, I would recommend this book for those who adore London as that is the setting for this book. This also makes room for some jokes about Americans that even I snickered at, despite being an American.

I would not recommend this book for those who may be offended or triggered by foul language, jealousy, manipulation, alcohol use, drug use, mild sexually suggestive scenarios, murder, and infidelity.

Please note: An electronic advanced reader copy of this book was generously provided by the Penguin First To Read Program in exchange for an honest review. This book is not expected to be released until February 20, 2018.

Love Is Blind by Lynsay Sands-a 5/5 Star Review!

Lady Clarissa Chambray is a clumsy embarrassment to her stepmother, Lydia, who is desperately trying to marry her off while her father is away on business. But it’s not Clarissa’s fault! Her clumsiness is cured when she can use her spectacles. However, her cruel stepmother breaks them so she won’t wear them around eligible men, convinced they make Clarissa hideous.

Hideous is a term Adrian Montfort (who happens to be the Earl of Mowbray) has gotten used to since returning from war with a scar across the length of his face. He escaped several seasons in his country estate but, at the nagging of his mother, he has returned to society in the hopes of securing a marriage. Meeting a beautiful eligible woman who cannot see anything, much less his scar, seems almost too good to be true. Once he discovers that many of her accidents do not add up, he is set on a mission for her protection and her heart.

Apparently, I’m on a regency romance roll, but I don’t mind.  Especially when I simply adored each of them! This book was recommended to my by a friend and the first book that I have read by Lynsay Sands-I loved it! I thought it might just be a regency romance but there were plenty of obstacles for Clarissa and Adrian to overcome not just together, but with the help of their supporters. There was adventure, mystery, romance, and best of all-forgiveness. I loved Clarissa because she is determined to not let anything get her down, she sees the best in everyone, protects those closest to her, and is quick to forgive. She reminded me of Cinderella (my all-time favorite Disney Princess) at times, which may have added to my fondness for her. I had a very difficult time putting this book down as it did have a fast pace as well as many moments where I had to muffle a laugh.

I would recommend this book for fans of regency romance as well as for those who enjoy reading about characters overcoming adversity.

However, I would not recommend this book for readers who are offended or triggered by mild foul language, explicit sexual scenarios, bullying, violence, and infidelity.