A Lady’s Virtue (Everton Domestic Society #3) by A. S. Fenichel- A 5/5 Star Review!

Sylvia Dowder, surrounded by shame from a broken engagement, joined the Everton Domestic Society.  This way her twin sister could still have a chance at an engagement this season.  Dumped due to her social status being lower than her fiancée’s, she gets back at the ton by moonlighting as a secret gossip columnist.  This is a creative outlet for her sparky nature to put certain gossipers in their place by calling them out in this column.  Getting a job through the Everton Domestic Society working for Anthony Braighton, the new Earl of Grafton, makes it harder to keep her writing a secret.  What other secrets is she able to keep?

 

Not too surprisingly, I loved this book! I have been a fan of A. S. Fenichel’s writing since the beginning of the trilogy before this series, the Forever Brides series (see my reviews #1, #2, #3, and Bonus).  The first book of the Forever Brides series (Tainted Bride) was about Sophia Braighton, Anthony’s sister.  It was fun to read the interactions between Anthony and his sister Sophia.  It was also fun to see the dynamic differences between the American siblings, Anthony and Sophia, and the rest of the English characters.  I found it very interesting how the author contrasted the character reactions to the new social status of Sylvia’s former fiancée and Anthony Braighton.  What also enriched the plot was how Sylvia and Anthony’s frank personalities brought them together.

 

This book is the third in the Everton Domestic Society series (see my reviews on the earlier here  and here ) but it can be read as a standalone.  There are references to previous characters, however, there are brief background updates for each of them that does not halt the pacing of the story.  I was very excited when a familiar character came into the story and it felt like a party was building with the familiar guests showing up.

 

I would definitely recommend this book for romance readers, particularly those fond of Regency Romances.  The romance is slowly built over situations and time making it more authentic for me as a reader.  I would recommend this book for adults as there are some graphically sexual scenarios.

 

I would not recommend this book for readers who may be triggered or offended by: graphically sexual scenarios, public shaming, alcoholism, parental dominance, or mild foul language.

 

Please note: an electronic ARC of this book was generously provided through the Goodreads Giveaway program.

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It’s Getting Scot in Here (Wild Wicked Highlanders #1) by Suzanne Enoch- this blog’s first 5/5 Star Review of 2019!

FINALLY! I had been struggling to find a book that I actually liked in 2019 and it has been a struggle.  Or, it was a struggle until I had the great opportunity to read Suzanne Enoch’s It’s Getting Scot in Here.  If the title alone doesn’t get you, the plot definitely will. Niall MacTaggert may very well be my new definition of swoon-worthy because I blushed, I giggled-I was swooning!

Amelia-Rose is stuck.  She and her big mouth has landed her in a position where she has barked off every suitor her mother has chosen for her.  Her mother insists on her marrying a man with a title, as she should have when she was younger.  Her father supports her mother but supports his drinking habit more.

The MacTaggert brothers are also stuck.  They barge into London enraged yet encaged in a binding agreement between their father and their absent mother, Francesca, which forces them to marry a woman from London.  Even worse: one of them has to marry a woman that their mother has already chosen.  Their mother who abandoned them as children and took their youngest sister with her to London while they grew up in Scotland.

Amelia-Rose is chosen by Francesca to be married to Coll, the most brutish of all three, and the eldest who will take on the title.  Coll keeps getting into trouble and his younger brother, the dashing peacekeeper Niall (I am still swooning, by the way), steps in for him to court Amelia-Rose and save her from embarrassment from the ton.  No one expected them to fall for each other.

I love the bantering between Niall and Amelia-Rose.  I love his persistence in making sure that she stays true to her character, not what people tell her to be.  I also loved that the brothers were very respectful and supportive of their sister that they did not get the opportunity to see grow up.  The brothers were simply a hilarious trio of mischief.   It was very entertaining when the three of them were in the same scene.  They call each other out yet still humor and maintain a level of respect.

The pacing was great in this book and it is very easy to get caught up in the world that Suzanne Enoch creates.  The villains are very clear in this book and still haunt me.   The character development, particularly of Niall, is very strong and I cannot praise this book enough!

In conclusion, I am thrilled that this is the first book in the Wild Wicked Highlanders because I simply must have more of these storylines!  It has the perfect balance of humor, romance, and conflict. I loved every page and I highly recommend this book to readers of romance, regency romance, and highlander romances.

For those who may be triggered/offended:  There was mild foul language, alcohol use, bullying, violence,  sibling separation, divorce/parental separation, and parental abandonment.

Please note: an electronic advanced reader copy of the book was generously provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  (Thank you!)

 

Want to get the book? Click here: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250296375

 

You can check out Suzanne Enoch’s website here: http://www.suzanneenoch.com

 

 

Forget You Know Me by Jessica Strawser-DNF at 51%-A 2/5 Star Review

Two friends separated geographically and by one friend being a new parent.  They finally find time to connect via Skype.  The conversation is awkward then interrupted by a waking child.

One friend is left waiting, the other struggling with pain to get to the now-wailing child.

One friend sees an intruder break-in but has no way of alerting the other friend.

What happens next?

 

Gripping, right?  That’s not only the premise of the story but it is also the very first chapter in summation.  I have to say: the first two chapters were very riveting!  It felt like the plot was moving quickly and I kept being surprised.  Then the resulting chapters I was either confused at the characters’ reactions or bored with the inner monologues and kept skimming.  The inner ramblings of the narrating characters ended up being the downfall for the book for me.  It showed that the characters are as awful internally as their actions have shown.  Their secrets that they kept from one another appears to have been intended to contribute towards the idea that this book is a psychological thriller.  However, in my opinion, it was just a boring novel about entitled suburban strife.  However aversive the adult characters may have been, the children were redeeming in that they were adorable and pure. 2 stars: One for Nori and One for Rosie.

Back to the inner monologues: there were many diatribes in narration, mostly justifying how horribly they are treating the other characters, that I kept finding myself skimming.  They were so lengthy at times that I was relieved when the chapter was finally over so I could put the book down for awhile.  Or I would keep putting the book down because it was a series of the worst things that could happen to a character, happening to each character, more than once.  I am not sure if the author was going with the idea that “bad things happen to good people” because these characters were not exactly great people.  Which is drilled into the readers’ head repeatedly.    Or maybe the author was trying to use catastrophic events to help build character.  But at the point that I stopped, halfway through, that still did not appear to have happened.  Instead, the characters all seem to be self-absorbed and blaming the other for one bad event or another.

There were so many bad things happening with each character that I stopped being surprised at any new element thrown in.  OF COURSE! I kept screaming at my Kindle.  OF COURSE the HR guy’s name is Toby, just like in The Office.  OF COURSE they’re going to mention that his name is like the guy in The Office.  OF COURSE Toby isn’t that great, no one in the book is.  OF COURSE there’s a shady neighbor.  OF COURSE the intruder is not who they originally thought.  OF COURSE there are money issues involved.  OF COURSE their life fell apart, everyone in this book is falling apart! You get the idea.

In conclusion: I would not recommend this book at all.  I would especially not recommend it for younger than adult audiences.  Lastly, I would not recommend this book for those who may be triggered or offended by: foul language, infidelity, intruders/break-ins, stalkers, addiction, marital strife, or arson.

Please note: an electronic ARC of this book was generously provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you!

 

Adele by Leila Slimani- DNF at 15%-a 1/5 Star Review

DNF at 15%

This book is just not for me. I cannot relate to the main character and I found her to be self-centered with a complete disregard for others’ feelings or any consequences. So far it has only been told in Adele’s point-of-view but it is not an interesting one. She just goes from assessing who she can see herself having sex with on the train to being annoyed by her son’s general existence. It did not seem like the plot was going to be any more than a chronology of emotionless sexual partners.

I would not recommend this book for any reader but I would especially not recommend it for anyone who may be triggered or offended by: foul language, explicitly sexual scenarios, and infidelity.

Please note: an electronic ARC of this book was generously provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

She Lies in Wait (DCI Jonah Sheens #1) by Gytha Lodge – A 2/5 Star Review

One girl has to tag along embarrassingly with her older sister on a camping trip with her sister’s friends. One night of secrets. One death that will take 30 years to solve. One Detective who knows more than he lets on.

This book was kind of hard to fly through at times. There is a fine line between detailing the setting and overloading on details as filler. However, it could also be the case that the overwhelming amount of details was due to it being the author’s debut novel. It was mostly very heavy on the interactions and operations of the office.

Furthermore, there is a subplot on a newbie detective with an abusive stalker of an ex-boyfriend that forces her to spend the night in a hotel at one point. The main issue with this is: there doesn’t seem to be a point to it. Since this is the first book in a series, perhaps the author is setting up a villain for the next book. Or could it be that the author was trying to humanize the character? There is not a resolution to this issue and it makes the plot a bit sporadic.

Another reason why I did not care for this particular book is because of the alternating narratives. Authors like Liane Moriarty (see review ) can pull off weaving multiple storylines and distinct narratives into one cohesive plot. Unfortunately, this did not happen in She Lies in Wait. Mostly because it starts off solely as alternating narrators of DCI Jonah Sheens in the present and Aurora in the past with chapter separation. Then, the narration switches between a random assortment of characters with only Hanson as a fairly common one with her confusing subplot. Furthermore, some of the other detectives are not established well so sometimes it was confusing on who the narrator was even supposed to be and pretty much muddied the plot.

The final reason why I did not care for this book is because it was almost obvious who the killer was from the early chapters. I had hoped that it couldn’t possibly be that obvious and must be a red herring but I was disappointed.

And so I can’t say that I am eager for the next book in the series. I do give props to the author as it is very hard to get your debut novel published. I would imagine it is even harder if that book is the first in a series. But, for me, this book is not one that I would recommend.

The following things were found in my reading of the book that may be offensive or trigger some readers: violence, drug use, alcohol use, drug abuse, sexual assault, sexually suggestive scenarios, foul language, murder, stalking, and psychological abuse.

Please note: an electronic ARC of this book was generously provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.