A Chance This Christmas (Road To Romance Book 3) by Joanne Rock-DNF at 13%

DNF at 13%-the first 13% is just basically repeating the events that chased Rachel out of town so many times that it is either excessive filler or the reader is supposed to be forced to pity Rachel.  Poor Rachel, her dad embezzled the town.  Poor Rachel, she has the Scarlet Letter because she kissed her ex-boyfriend’s friend.  Poor Rachel, she has to hide herself and sneak around town so they won’t come after her with pitchforks.  It was redundant and irritating.

Furthermore, it already made it abundantly clear that Gavin, the one she shared the controversial kiss with, is famous, handsome, perfect, and will be the hero and Prince Charming.  I cannot finish this book and I cannot imagine how it is the third book in a series.

Please note: an electronic copy of this review was generously provided via LibraryThing’s EarlyReviewer Program in exchange for an honest review.

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Sharing You (Sharing You #1) by Molly McAdams-DNF at 20%

DNF at 20%-unrealistic and irritating. KC runs away from her upper-class family to avoid an arranged marriage and sets up her own bakery in a small town. This comes across as justified as her groom-to-be was painted as a misogynist snob. Brody is stuck in a marriage to a vicious woman who drains their bank accounts for fun. They accidentally run into each other (literally) and the spell was cast. They both can’t stop thinking about each other, dreaming about each other, and neither have ever felt this alive. Oh, the tragedy! To me, it all felt like a modernized regency romance where she is running away from her betrothed and miraculously into the arms of the rake/rogue/duke/earl (Brody who is miserably married in this case) that cannot marry/shouldn’t marry her for whatever reason.

Also, the dialogue was so cheesy to me that it was unrealistic. Someone you have only had a five minute conversation with comes into your work and asks you to define the relationship that you don’t have yet because you’ve only had a five minute conversation? And this is shortly after “accidentally” crashing the date you were on with someone else? How is this realistic? I have not read any books by Molly McAdams before but, based off of the writing in this book, I can’t say that I would be eager to read another one anytime soon.

Please note: A physical copy of this book was generously provided through the LibraryThing Early Reviewer’s program in exchange for an honest review.

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin-A 1/5 Star Review

It’s a question that many have been asked: If you could be told the exact date you will die, would you want to know? The 4 Gold siblings came across a fortune teller who offered this information right around a time where each of them discovered the fragility of life. Little did they know that finding out when they will die would affect the rest of their lives. Told in four parts, one part focusing on the life of each sibling, The Immortalists goes deep into the choices we make and their lasting effects.

 

DNF at 28%: Getting through Simon’s story took substantial effort and deflated any hope I had of finishing the rest of the book. It was fairly easy to tell the tone and style just through the first story alone. Dark and jagged. It is not for the optimistic, to say the least. Furthermore, it felt jagged in the sense that it feels like it was written with random ideas thrown in and then patched together instead of a smooth plot line. For example, Simon and his very serious boyfriend will be having a serious conversation and then, mid-conversation, Simon has his hands down his boyfriend’s pants. His boyfriend is even annoyed by this, as I was as the reader, as it seemed out of place and it happens often. It feels like the author wasn’t sure how the characters should handle conflict so she randomly threw in sexual moments that seem out of place. It basically lacked intimacy and fluidity. Along with that is that the story is so choppy that it is hard to feel connected to any of the characters. It felt like the author had a bunch of ideas that she came up with and threw them all in rather than catering the plot to the one or two great ideas. For example: Simon is the oldest, most responsible, supposed to take over the family business, yet runs off to San Francisco, becomes a dancer for a club named Purple (oooooooh what if we have the dancers paint themselves Purple to realllly blend it together?), yet also becomes a polished ballet dancer during the day with his miraculous talent that he only recently started training yet learns quickly and gets a part onstage.

For all of these reasons, I had to put the book down after Simon’s story and move on. I would not recommend this book, clearly. However, I would especially not recommend this book for those readers who may be offended or triggered by explicitly graphic sexual scenarios, foul language, broken families, grief, fortune-telling, death, STDs, runaway teens, or infidelity.

Please note: an electronic Advanced Reader Copy of this book was generously provided through Penguin’s First To Read program in exchange for an honest review.

Forever My Girl (Beaumont #1) by Heidi McLaughlin-A 1/5 Star Review

DNF at 17%

The love of Josie’s life was her high school sweetheart, Liam. Was. Up until he left her at the altar to pursue his music career and left her behind. A tragedy brings Liam back into town but can it bring back their love?

Ok, I’ll admit. I went on a hunt for this book because I saw the trailer for the movie release. Conveniently releasing right around Valentine’s Day, the trailer looked like it teeters on the edge of a great love story and a hokey attempt at romance. The book falls over on the latter. I tried a few chapters and once I audibly groaned “OH MY GODDDD!”, it was over for me. It tries to mix in grief, friendship, and the-one-that-got-away romance but it just wasn’t blending well together. It felt very contrived and rushed with the dialogue between characters unbelievably cheesy. It felt more like a generic outline or brainstorm of a book rather than a well-developed plot.

 

As You Wish by Chelsea Sedoti-DNF at 25%

I am putting this down at 25% and marking it DNF for several reasons:

1. The writing style. It was slow and repetitive which made it quite boring, in my opinion. Which was so disappointing because I liked Chelsea Sedoti’s previous book, The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett. In that book, I enjoyed how the secrets were slowly revealed and how the concept of perfect is fake. This book seems to have kind of the same motivation with the main character, Eldon, which I will get to in the next point.

2. Eldon. The main character, the only perspective the story is told, and the tragic teenager. He was an all-star football jock with a great girlfriend and a great family in his small town but then he falls from glory. His girlfriend wishes to be prettier and dumps him. His sister is dead (or dying/in a coma? It’s kind of unclear at this point) and he is no longer the all-star athlete as other teammates have wished to be the best. His history has darkened his future, I get it. But I found him to be profoundly irritating. He has the extraordinary opportunity to make any wish he wants for his 18th birthday and he hates it. I get that other people’s wishes have had a negative effect on his life but he is actively rebelling and avoiding making the choice of what wish to make, but it does not do anything to prevent him from turning 18. This story seems to be more about how he is the bitterly angry victim rather than the underdog hero.

3. His parents. I understand that they too are under a tremendous amount of financial stress, however, I think the author is trying too hard to make them (one in particular) either the scapegoat or the villains. The guilt trips and the manipulations are slightly redeeming when their wish history is revealed, however, it is still a little bit of overkill.

In conclusion, I did not like this book. It’s taken me 3 weeks of debating whether or not I should pick it back up again before I finally decided to let bygones be bygones. I am not writing off (pun intended) the author, Chelsea Sedoti. I am just going to be the opposite of Eldon and be optimistic that her next book will be better.

Please note: An electronic copy of this book was generously provided for free by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

Poison by Galt Niederhoffer- DNF at 20%

There are too many great books out there for me to waste time on books like Poison. It felt like I was reading a basic outline of a piece of fiction rather than a completed novel. I skimmed through a lot of this 20% that I did read because the writing style is excessive yet basic. For example, when describing the wife it was something along the lines of saying she’s a former single mother of two, now baby makes three, and new husband makes a family of five. She works from home, requiring a babysitter so she can work while at home, working on the household chores while working, baby screaming while she’s on the phone, covering the phone with her hand to block out the screams, yet keeping a professional tone despite the maternal desire to soothe the baby.

I wish I could say that was an extreme example, however, I do not think it was that far of a stretch. It was excessively wordy yet not really revealing anything. The new husband is also excessive. He is over the top in the examples of how seemingly perfect he is supposed to be that I already did not trust him within the first few pages. It is clear that he is a bad guy, but what is not clear yet is why and how. I am sure that is further discussed in the book but, quite frankly, I just don’t care.

Please note: An electronic copy of this book was generously provided for free from the Publisher via NetGalley in exhcange for an honest review (thank you!).