Under The Table by Stephanie Evanovich-DNF at 16%

DNF at 16%– I absolutely could not possibly read another page of this book. It took me three weeks of picking it up to read a chapter and finding more reason to delay reading more.

The main character is terrified of being in a major city like New York City and has to text her sister and her roommate when she has made it to destinations. Yet she is so city savvy that she is going to take on shy millionaire “geek” and teach him how to live in the tough city? Tristan is drop-dead gorgeous yet (OF COURSE) wears a bow tie and suspenders to a business dinner because we have to drill in the fact that he is a “geek”. It just seemed like the writing was so rushed that they took all of the brainstorms for a character and shoved it into the first two chapters in order to fill in a lack of a plot. I assume the ex-husband is supposed to be a villain character but instead he is also an over-the-top meathead. I also assume this is in order to contrast with “geek” Tristan to make him more perfect. It was excessive and I cannot force myself to go through any more of this so-called plot.

Please note: a physical ARC of this novel was generously provided by the publisher through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Program-thank you for the opportunity!

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Fallen Mountains by Kimi Cunningham Grant – A 3/5 Star Review

This book had a plot that progressed well, had vicious villains, and other great characters. However, it was very heavy on hunting and guns, as well as other things I am not interested in. There were a couple of scenes that were very graphically detailed. For example, there is a scene where Chase Hardy is hunting deer and intentionally decides to shoot one in a location where the deer would suffer an incredibly painful death, rather than killing it instantly. Another example is when Transom shoots a rabbit and then the narrator goes into gory detail on how the rabbit is then skinned. These scenes made me uncomfortable but I will say that they contributed symbolism and foreshadowing to the plot.

What also made me uncomfortable in this book was how Laney was treated for being a woman. Not only that but how she was written in the book as being weak, particularly around men. There is a scene where Transom literally refers to her as a piece of meat yet she still falls for his charms. I was screaming “GIRL NOOO!!”and it infuriated me how she was treated by Transom and she accepted it. Another example of this is when she tells Transom that she is seeing Chase and he blames Laney for their affair, even though she had initially told him she was no longer interested in their affair.

It is a well thought-out story and I absolutely loved how well the environment of the setting was described. It is very easy to be submerged into this plot and have strong feelings-good or bad- about each character. It is because the reader is so easily submerged that those graphic scenes and the Laney character in general had me more uncomfortable than I remember feeling about a book.

I would recommend this book for readers who enjoy hunting and/or may have grown up on a farm. This book is very heavy on farm life and the pros and cons of it. I would recommend this book also for readers who enjoy a surprise ending as this one is great.

On the other hand, I would not recommend this book for readers who may be triggered and/or offended by: grief, death, male chauvinism, graphic violence, kidnapping, hostage situations, violence towards animals, hunting, addiction (prescription pills in particular), fracking, deforestation, and betrayal.

Please note: an Audio CD of this book was generously provided by the publisher for free through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Program in exchange for an honest review.

A Chance This Christmas (Road To Romance Book 3) by Joanne Rock-DNF at 13%

DNF at 13%-the first 13% is just basically repeating the events that chased Rachel out of town so many times that it is either excessive filler or the reader is supposed to be forced to pity Rachel.  Poor Rachel, her dad embezzled the town.  Poor Rachel, she has the Scarlet Letter because she kissed her ex-boyfriend’s friend.  Poor Rachel, she has to hide herself and sneak around town so they won’t come after her with pitchforks.  It was redundant and irritating.

Furthermore, it already made it abundantly clear that Gavin, the one she shared the controversial kiss with, is famous, handsome, perfect, and will be the hero and Prince Charming.  I cannot finish this book and I cannot imagine how it is the third book in a series.

Please note: an electronic copy of this review was generously provided via LibraryThing’s EarlyReviewer Program in exchange for an honest review.

Sharing You (Sharing You #1) by Molly McAdams-DNF at 20%

DNF at 20%-unrealistic and irritating. KC runs away from her upper-class family to avoid an arranged marriage and sets up her own bakery in a small town. This comes across as justified as her groom-to-be was painted as a misogynist snob. Brody is stuck in a marriage to a vicious woman who drains their bank accounts for fun. They accidentally run into each other (literally) and the spell was cast. They both can’t stop thinking about each other, dreaming about each other, and neither have ever felt this alive. Oh, the tragedy! To me, it all felt like a modernized regency romance where she is running away from her betrothed and miraculously into the arms of the rake/rogue/duke/earl (Brody who is miserably married in this case) that cannot marry/shouldn’t marry her for whatever reason.

Also, the dialogue was so cheesy to me that it was unrealistic. Someone you have only had a five minute conversation with comes into your work and asks you to define the relationship that you don’t have yet because you’ve only had a five minute conversation? And this is shortly after “accidentally” crashing the date you were on with someone else? How is this realistic? I have not read any books by Molly McAdams before but, based off of the writing in this book, I can’t say that I would be eager to read another one anytime soon.

Please note: A physical copy of this book was generously provided through the LibraryThing Early Reviewer’s program in exchange for an honest review.

A Lady In Shadows (A Madeleine Karno Mystery #2) by Lene Kaaberbol- a 3/5 Star Review!

Madeleine Karno, a.k.a. “Doctor Death”, is female forensic pathologist in the late 1800s. She also finds herself to be an investigator as one particular case of a murdered prostitute whose abdomen was destroyed. Faced with constant scrutiny based on her being a female, Madeleine is determined to find the young woman’s murderer.

This book is extremely detailed in the scientific aspects where the author has clearly done a lot of research not only in forensic pathology but for obstetrics. Furthermore, it is extremely detailed in the historical aspects which may have history buffs rejoicing. However, it is also heavy with multiple concepts thrown into it which can be confusing at times. I understand that the author was probably trying to point out how very different life was in the 19th century. Especially for a female, a bisexual, and a prostitute-these are actually three different characters. Yet, to me it felt distracting. For example: I am still not really sure what the point of Madeleine’s fiancee’s former male lover had to do with the story. It seemed to be yet another (forced) example of what a wonderful character Madeleine is in her willingness to still be with her fiancee as she would have to provide for him once they were married because this would otherwise put him exile. A lot of the book has to do with other characters complimenting the main character on her strength, intelligence, persistence, caring nature, fearlessness, and her slim figure. Personally, I found her to be my least favorite character as she came across as spoiled, quick to anger, disrespectful, and insufferable.

Although this book is part of a series, it can easily be read as a standalone. I was not even aware that this was the second book in a series until I went to write the review. For those who are fans of audio CDs and/or audiobooks in general, I would recommend listening to this book on AudioCD or audiobook. Nicola Barber does a wonderful job narrating the book and her inflections and varying voices greatly contribute to the overall tone of the book.

Conversely, I would not recommend this book for anyone who may be triggered or offended by the following: graphic violence, kidnapping, murder, abortion, prostitution, infidelity, sexual scenarios, and anti-feminism. Moreover, if you find that trauma to the eye is especially offensive (like I do), be warned that there is an especially graphic scene involving that horrific concept.

Please note: an audioCD of this book was generously provided by LibraryThing’s Early Reviewer program in exchange for an honest review.

These Vicious Masks (These Vicious Masks #1) by Tarun Shanker & Kelly Zekas, Narrated by Heather Wilds- a 1/5 Star Review

 

Please note: A AudioCD copy of this book was generously provided for free through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program, in exchange for an honest review.