The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman-a 1/5 Review!

Irene was born into the Librarian life. Her parents were librarians and she strives to rise in the ranks despite not being able to see her parents often. Kai is an apprentice of The Library, and has been involved for 5 years but has yet become an official Librarian. A former petty criminal, he fell into the Library and has since decided to dedicate his life. On one special mission Kai is assigned to train under Irene. Two different personalities from two very different backgrounds, can they work together to complete the mission?

DNF at 34%. I did not care for this book because it would be somewhat engaging then it would snap back into something boring. An example of this is the whole section where Kai is explained the workings of The Library and it felt like the book stalled just to explain everything instead of throwing in bits and pieces as they go along. There was a lot of detail defining chaos although I did not feel like I fully understood it.

Another reason why I did not finish the book is because I felt like it threw too many concepts into one plot. For example: there is a scene where Irene and Kai are one-upping each other on how many sexual partners they have had as they debate whether or not the two of them should have sex. It felt flat and shallow as it was just something to add to exist in the story and not something of importance.

It seemed pretty obvious from the beginning that there was something off about a “helpful” character. Since I have not read the rest of the book, I will leave it at that as I do not want to accidentally spoil anything.

I did not enjoy this book, however, I could see fans who love time travel and steampunk liking it. It did not stir any emotions in me and felt like a chore to read so I am putting it down. This was a selection for a book club that I am in and I picked it up from the library. I hope whoever gets it next has a better experience with it than I did!

Plus One by Elizabeth Fama- a 3/5 Star Review

Sol is a Smudge, part of the Night sector of the population that had been divided into half. She is a lowly factory worker struggling to juggle school, work, her brother’s abandonment, and being the sole caretaker for her dying grandfather. After finding out that her brother, Ciele, has gotten married and is expecting a baby soon with his new wife, she sets on a mission to make sure that her grandfather can hold his great-granddaughter before he dies. Even if it is just once, she would sacrifice everything for this one dying wish. She knows the consequences, a long jail sentence and probably miss out on her grandfather’s death, but she is bullheaded and fiercely loyal. This mission takes far longer than expected and goes way off course, but it is a journey filled with revealing secrets and unexpected friendships.

I am really torn on how to feel about this book. On the one hand, the idea of the population being separated by Day and Night and the Night people’s brains being affected by it felt very similar to Scott Westerfeld’s Uglies. Especially when two doctors are the ones who let the secret out to the protagonist who then uses it to their advantage later. But on the other hand, it is a different concept than the popular dystopian concept that this was forced because the world is in destruction and one population must save themselves from the other population who is ruining the world. Yet, it is in response to a flu epidemic that threatened to wipe out society. However, after the epidemic seemed to resolve, no action was taken to try to combine the two populations again.

Another thing that I am torn about with this book is that I felt that the romance was sweet at times yet forced at other times. I liked that she and D’Arcy (although I mentally kept calling him Mr. Darcy) had met each other in the past over a shared interest without realizing it until later. But I did not like how frequently Sol tried to sacrifice herself for him, often behind his back, as it came across as more of a dramatic need to be tragic rather than smart. It did not really feel like they worked together throughout the book but that he was a forced sidekick so that there could be an element of romance. Their love story just did not ever feel cohesive.

Another issue I had was the amount of kidnapping that happened. It was not just one baby that got kidnapped, but two babies and a dying elderly person. There were too many things that were far too convenient to make the action sequences seem like tangible concepts. The scene that annoyed me the most was when she had to carry a baby, zipped up under her hoodie, on a hot and bumpy subway that did not cry or make any noises at all. Then she got off the subway and took off and there was not any mention of the infant. What hoodie is designed to mask a live baby simply by zipping up?

Aside from these negatives of the book, it was not so terrible that I could not finish. Actually, I wanted to finish the book. It was an adventure when I was not stumbling through the literary obstacles. I must also admit that the cover of the book is lovely and perfectly fits this novel.

The narrator, Julia Whelan, did well in the sense that Sol’s “voice” would have had that pessimistic angst that seems to be a part of the stereotypical teenage character. However, the main woe-is-me voice got on my nerves after awhile. Conversely, the parts where she had to speak French and even sing made the book more interesting.

I would recommend this book for readers who are really interested in technology as that was a major factor. I would also recommend this book for readers who may be fluent in or familiar with French as that was also a large part of the book.

I would not recommend this book for those who may be offended by foul language, sexually suggestive scenarios, betrayal, kidnapping, bullying, gang activity, and death.

Please note: I was able to download an audiobook copy of this file for free through Audiofile magazine’s Sync’s weekly (this was one of Week 7’s book options) free summer audiobook program via using the Overdrive app (the link is here).

Clockwork Prince (The Infernal Devices #2) by Cassandra Clare-a 5/5 Star Review!

The adventure continues for Tessa Gray, Will Herondale, and James Carstairs.  As they chase after more clues to find out who Tessa really is and why The Magister so desperately wants her.  New twists and turns for these three, and the other characters introduced in Clockwork Angel, make for a spell-binding adventure.

NEW OBSESSION ALERT! I am officially obsessed with Will Herondale.  Also, I am officially obsessed with this The Infernal Devices series.  I loved Clockwork Angel (see review here) cannot wait to get my hands on Clockwork Princess.  Every time that I think there is finally a time to breathe and regain composure throughout the book, I am catapulted into another spinning plot twist.  The depth of not only the plot but each character (and there are quite a few) is immense.  I have not read a book in a long time that has forced me to react outwardly.  The world that Cassandra Clare creates is entirely consuming and it became difficult to separate myself from the book and reality.  I want to be part of Tessa, Jem, and (most especially) Will’s world.  It is gripping, encompassing, and unpredictable.  I root for these characters, I hope for these characters, and I grieve with these characters.  I have found this series to be riveting and invigorating!

Although I have only read 2 of the 3 books in this series, I highly recommend the series to those who love action, betrayal, romance, and fantasy.  I think it is appropriate for readers over the age of 16 and I recommend it for those seeking adventure.

On the other hand, I would not recommend this book for those who do not appreciate betrayal, violence, manipulation, demons, magic, love triangles, unrequited love, or drug addiction.  Furthermore, I would not recommend this book for readers who have not read Clockwork Angel yet, as it would be very confusing.

Lastly, I listened to this book on AudioCD.  It was read by Heather Lind and Ed Westwick. More than half was definitely read by Heather Lind, who was fantastic and gave a unique voice to each of the many characters.  Additionally, I also really enjoyed listening to Ed Westwick read the parts when it was in Will’s perspective.  His deep, sultry voice, made Will’s character even more alluring.

Clockwork Angel (The Infernal Devices #1) by Cassandra Clare- a 5/5 Star Review!

Tessa is in London desperately searching for her brother Nate but the only thing she keeps finding is growing strength in her superpower as a shape-changer.  She did not even know she had this power until she was kidnapped right off of the boat in London from New York.  She is rescued by Will and finds herself immersed in the world of Shadowhunters who are often battling Downworlders.  She struggles to trust anyone in this new world but this journey not only teaches her what her powers are, but who she is entirely.

I will fully admit, fantasy was not a genre that I thought I would like.  That is until I read Enchantment recently (see review here: Enchantment by Orson Scott Card- a 4/5 Star Review! ).  Thanks to the book club that I recently joined, I got to check that out.  When the genre this month was Urban Fantasy and Clockwork Angel was selected, I was hesitant to say the least.  However, just like with the last few books that have been selected in the Book Club, my low expectations were exceeded.  Despite the length of the book, it was very fast-paced and I had a hard time having to put the book down each time.  I knew I was going to love Will from the beginning with his wit and charm.  I did not expect the depth his character brought nor that I would be so pleased that he wasn’t “rescued” by his emotional trauma just by one kiss.  I love when that happens in Disney movies but it would not have been appropriate for it to have happened in this gothic action plot.  I appreciate that Cassandra Clare treated their potential romance by requiring understanding and patience.  Furthermore, I also appreciated that the author made each of these characters distinct yet worked diligently at binding them together.  Furthermore, I listened to about half of this on AudioCD read by Jennifer Ehle who I highly recommend as an audiobook reader.  She was able to give unique voices and accents to each character yet have a different voice for when she is not reading dialogue.

There were victories, tragedies, heroes, betrayers, villains, unexpected twists, clever inventions, shape-shifting, disease, several sources of unrequited love, and there was a cat! The dialogue was deep at times and witty at others.  I found myself taking notes of lines from the book that struck a chord with me.  Some examples are:

“It’s all right to love someone who doesn’t love you back, as long as they’re worth you loving them.  As long as they deserve it”.

“It is as great a thing to love as it is to be loved.  Love is not something that can be wasted”.

 “Whatever you are physically…male or female, strong or weak, ill or healthy—all those things matter less than what your heart contains.  If you have the soul of a warrior, you are a warrior.  All those other things, they are the glass that contains the lamp, but you are the light inside”.

I love it when an author references other works of literature.  Additionally, I also simply adore when a romance starts from a mutual appreciation of reading.  This just adds to the many reasons why I love this book, she starts each chapter with a few lines of a poem.  Later on in her acknowledgements she states that she used poems that would have mostly been around in the time that this book was set.  I also enjoyed the references to A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.  After I finished this book, I quickly added it to the top of my TBR pile.  It is invigorating to read a book that inspires you to read books they slyly suggest.

I would recommend this book to readers who enjoy steampunk, historical fiction, fantasy, fast-paced action, unrequited love, complicated families, feminism, hints of romance, and those who love references to other books within a book (as I just mentioned).

On the other hand, I would not recommend this book to those who do not enjoy violence, murder, foul language (although I only noticed two curse words in the book), or demons.

 

Uglies (The Uglies #1) by Scott Westerfeld- a 5/5 Star Review!

Tally Youngblood is Ugly and the worst part is that her best friend, Peris, just turned Pretty. Therefore, they have to cut off all communication and Peris has to start a new life among the Pretties. It is a fun transition as the newly minted Pretties party nonstop while the Uglies sit in purgatory waiting their turn. She decides one night to sneak out and surprise Peris by dropping in to say hi, even though the consequences may be severe.

But Peris is completely different, not just physically. The disappointing trek back to Uglytown has her crossing paths with Shay, a fellow Ugly sneaking to see her friends who had just transitioned. The two of them form a friendship that has them both testing their beliefs and their newfound friendship.

I was surprised to find that I really enjoyed this book! I was introduced to it by the Young Adult Book Club that I joined recently and was able to pick it up at my local library. It was easy to breeze through and once the setup is described in detail, then the action really picks up. I have already recommended this book to a 13 year old that I babysit as I think it is geared more towards his age group. Also because the use of hoverboards made for an exciting adventure. Despite not being in that age group anymore, I still found myself connecting with these characters. I remember being swayed by new friends when I had other plans in place. I remember the naïveté of that age where you believe that adults can be trusted and the world is a certain way for a good reason. I also remember the sharp pain that comes when your crush is crushing on someone else, or the pull when your friend’s crush is crushing on you.

Another point that I really liked about this book is how Tally’s potential and anger builds slowly. She initially did not want to be part of the “Smoke” but was forced to be in order to be allowed to turn into a Pretty. The experience leaves her so jaded and rightfully so!

I would recommend this book for those in the early teens or older who can understand a bit better.

I would not recommend this book for those who may be offended by malicious acts, manipulation, espionage, plastic surgery, rule-breaking, and murder. I did not notice anything sexual in nature nor any foul language or graphic violence.

Please note: This book does end on a cliffhanger!

Enchantment by Orson Scott Card- a 4/5 Star Review!

Ivan’s childhood was full of changes. His family had to change religions which brought Ivan and his father Piotr to the painful decision of post-infancy circumcision. Then they had to move from Russia to America. Through all of these changes, what brought Ivan peace and stability was running. One run through the forest on his uncle’s farm brought him to a magical chasm where the leaves danced away as Ivan approached for a closer look at a woman sleeping on a bed of rock. Ivan did what he did best: he ran.

Years later, Ivan never could shake off the feeling that he should have looked closer at the woman and tried to help her. Through a series of seemingly coincidental events, Ivan finds himself back at his uncle’s farm. One curious run into the forest and Ivan finds the same woman buried under the leaves. This time, he doesn’t run.

This was a selection for a book club that I have recently joined, otherwise I might not have picked it up. This is the first book that I have read by Orson Scott Card as fantasy books are not really my preferred genre. However, fairy tales are one of my favorites, and this came across as a clever retelling of Sleeping Beauty mixed with the folk tales of Baba Yaga and other deities. Orson Scott Card’s Enchantment, although fantasy, surprised me in this combination of the three. I was further surprised that there were a few points where I lost interest yet it was quickly regained. This is not the sort of book that I could read in one sitting, as it was rather long and at some points long-winded. However, it is the sort of book that I could quickly pick up again the next day or even a few hours later. That is to say that I found it neither repulsive nor gripping.

I enjoyed the storyline for the most part and I also enjoyed the alternating perspectives between Ivan, Katerina, and Baba Yaga. I thought Baba Yaga was the character written the strongest as she was despicable yet entertaining. I also enjoyed the minor details earlier in the book that became major details later. For example: a vague note from a deceased neighbor in the beginning of the book played a major factor in one of the final action sequences. Although I love fairy tales, I do enjoy the struggle that Katerina and Ivan had in their relationship. They did not love each other immediately, rather they fell for each other at different paces.

I would recommend this book for any reader looking for an enchanting fantasy read with a leading female character and a bit of historical fiction.

On the other hand, I would not recommend this book for readers who do not enjoy foul language, violence, revenge, murder, and sexually suggestive scenarios.

The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett by Chelsea Sodeti-5/5 Star Review

Lizzie Lovett has it all: good looks, popularity, and plenty of boys lining up for her.  Hawthorn Creely believes Lizzie was born with good luck and her whole life has been handed to her.  Hawthorn fixates on her resentment for Lizzie as she tries to survive high school.  But when Lizzie Lovett goes camping with her boyfriend and doesn’t come back, everything, and everyone, changes.

The story is told from Hawthorn Creely’s perspective and the reader becomes very intimate with her every thought.  Hawthorn is guarded, insecure, self-centered, immature, and jealous.  These attributes are generally unpleasant, however, in this YA it is perfection.  As an adult, I can look back on my teenage years and realize that I had these attributes sometimes in high school.

Negative attributes aside, she also has a thirst for knowledge, wild imagination, a fierce independence, and a naivete that often gets the best of her.  When Lizzie Lovett goes missing, Hawthorn is initially dry and arrogant.  However, her fixation changes from resenting her to wanting to become more like her.  She finds ways to assimilate into Lizzie Lovett’s life in limbo.

What I liked most about this book is the authentic nature of Hawthorn’s experience.  It is realistically honest and raw.  She is not the hero.  Everything does not go according to plan.  Friends do not stay the same.  People are not always what they seem. Life is not always sunshine and fairy tales.  Disappointment will come, even when you work hard and try your best.

I highly recommend this book for anyone who has gone through high school.  Those in high school and younger may not understand (or believe) that people often change drastically after high school.  High school is a time to grow into who you will be and that process is different for everyone.

To whom it may concern: there is some foul language, sexually suggestive scenarios, and suicidal themes.

Please note: An electronic copy of this book was generously provided for free by the Publisher via Netgalley.